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Welcome

During these challenging times, users of the NCI-SW laboratories have been developing solutions for a number of issues raised by the Covid-19 pandemic. As described in this newsletter, Dr. Paul Westerhoff, faculty director of the LCnano research center, is part of a team that received funding from the National Science Foundation to study how nanoparticles Read More …

Nanocellulose – Who Would Have Thought of All the Applications?

The April 2020, NCI-SW webinar, Nanoengineering Cellulose for Environmental & Biomedical Applications captured the attention of many of our colleagues, as it made reference to “hairy” nanocellulose. Presenter Amir Sheikhi, Professor at Penn State University, described how these micro- and nanoengineered soft materials have many biological applications, and yes it is cellulose, the material that Read More …

Light from Nanoparticles

The featured May 2020 NCI-SW webinar, Luminescent Nanoparticles of Metal Oxides, shared exciting information about nanomaterials that emit light. Specifically, how you could synthesize certain nanomaterials to emit light, and “tune” these materials to provide the color (wavelengths) that you wanted. Yuanbing Mao, Professor and Chair, Department of Chemistry, Illinois Institute of Technology, reminded us Read More …

NCI-SW and ASU’s Open Door 2020

By Ray Tsui, NCI-SW Education & Outreach Coordinator.  Arizona State University hosts an annual spring Open Door event inviting the public to come and learn about the wide range of research and capabilities at the school. The event for the Tempe campus took place on February 22nd, where NCI-SW put on an exhibit called “Look Read More …

Engineering a Response for COVID-19 Protective Equipment

Professor Paul Westerhoff’s LCnano laboratory, at Arizona State University, is one of six collaborative research partners of NCI-SW. Their skill is largely nanoengineering but when the COVID-19, coronavirus pandemic was declared, one of the most immediate problems recognized was the urgent need for medical equipment, in particular, personal protective equipment (PPE.) Could it be reused, Read More …

Welcome

By Trevor Thornton, NCI-SW Director The fall semester is in the final stages and we wanted to share with you some of the interesting and exciting events and research happening with NCI-SW. The NNCI Annual Conference was held at the Harvard University campus on October 23 – 25, coinciding with a glorious spell of east Read More …

If it is Summer, it is time for Research

NCI-SW continued its summer tradition of offering undergraduate students the opportunity to perform research at ASU. Two students, Samantha Faltermeier and Amanda Morrison, were selected for the 2019 Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program. Both are from Phoenix College, one of the 10 schools within the Maricopa Community Colleges system. Both students had the opportunity Read More …

ASU Featured Nano Research: Laser-activated Nanosealants (LANS)

The National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering featured ASU researcher Kaushal Rege, Ph.D., Professor of Chemical Engineering in the following article:  https://www.nibib.nih.gov/news-events/newsroom/laser-activated-silk-sealants-outperform-sutures-tissue-repair Dr. Rege’s comments on this work clarify some of the ground breaking advances their research results provide. Rege said that “Our results demonstrated that our combination of tissue-integrating nanomaterials, along with the Read More …

NanoPhotonics

Integrated Nanophotonics was the subject of the Oct. 17, 2019 NCI-SW webinar. Consider, the combination of those two words, nano and photonics, with the goal of moving signals around with light, as we would do with electricity. The key technology device is called a PIC, Photonics Integrated Circuit. View the recording here. The use of Read More …

Multi-Responsive Nanogels for Biosensing, Drug Delivery, and Regenerative Medicine

We hope you will join us for the upcoming Feb. 20, 2020 webinar when we will feature Dr. John Clegg, from Harvard University, who will discuss synthetic strategies for generating nanoscale hydrogels that recognize and respond to multiple biological stimuli. These multi-responsive nanomaterials are useful for (i) actuating biological signals, (ii) targeting drug delivery, and Read More …